Recent artwork

Like many of you, I rejoice that creativity in all forms is not in lockdown – and as I posted previously, I am very grateful to remain a connected, active member of a number of groups, including the Shoal of Art Meetup group, which I first got involved with a few years ago when I joined the Meetup group that usually meets at the National Gallery in London, and also for various portrait sessions likewise based in London.

As I mentioned in last month’s post, I am also writing an historical novel, and grateful for the daily discipline of joining the Writers’ Hour sessions at the London Writers Salon to aid my progress in that. Being connected with other artists, writers and creators online during this time has been a huge part of the reason I have rarely, if at all, felt lonely, and instead have remained upbeat, fulfilled – even excited – throughout lockdown.

So, here is a small sample of artworks I have created since lockdown began – mostly in order of creation from most recent to shortly after lockdown began in 2020, they include: various portrait and landscape sketches (charcoal, pastel, watercolour, pencil); watercolours, pastels and acrylic paintings of animals (birds, particularly, as well as some animal-themed banners and sashes I created for the HS2 Rebellion March in June 2020 [I have also made countless effective placards, some of which have been lost while en route to protests in London and elsewhere]); contour pen and pencil drawings of live and static models; a few autumn-themed acrylic, watercolour and mixed-media landscape paintings; and interpretative copies of works of known artists (Monet, Rembrandt, Matisse, Gauguin, Bonnard, etc) from the National Gallery and other sources. Most of the portrait sketches were 15–30 minute poses.

Sitter from the #draweachother sessions from the Wednesday night Meetup session led by John Pipal
My watercolour of professional model Sassetta in a recent Sunday afternoon Meetup session organised by Mark Lovelace
Christmas pomegranates – watercolour
Recent pencil sketch of Ana Lucia from the Wednesday #draweachother session; below, two views of a model in a similar session, watercolour and pastel
Pastel from a photo of my friend Gemma Rogers on a wintry local walk
Several sections of Monet’s Giverney paintings, above and below

From a Gauguin self-portrait
Pastel landscape, section of a painting by Bonnard (?)
From Rembrandt, Portrait of an Old Man
Two charcoal sketches focusing on aging; below, three pastel landscapes
A combination of a #30-daysketchbook challenge exercise and a National Gallery group focus on winter scenes
Above, Kingfisher – watercolour; left; colourful bird in South Carolina

Below: various images of sashes and placards I created to highlight specific species threatened by HS2 for the June 2020 HS2 Rebellion March

Charcoal – sketch from a black and white still
Above: two views of the same live professional model, both charcoal
Autumn tree, watercolour, from FB photo by Denise Hutchison
Pastel landscape, from my own photos
Above, two mixed-media autumn landscape paintings from Debra Collis’s WEA course
Watercolour 15-minute sketch of Debra Collis (not a great likeness, however); below, two acrylic paintings of a professional model
Above, two charcoal, pastel and pen countour drawings from a recent figurative drawing session
Two charcoal views of a professional model
Above: 1. copy in charcoal of a Bonnard (?) painting and 2. copy in pastel of a Matisse painting
Colour pencil combined portraits
Autumn landscape, London – watercolour
Above and below, sketches of live and stationary life-drawing models
Another section of a Monet Giverney painting – pastel
Pastel of George Floyd, shortly after his death in relation to the Black Lives Matter protest

I certainly have a long way to go yet in developing my skills, individual style and knowledge of various media; while I have been drawing and painting all my life (and only with a small amount of university, etc art training), I am unable to say whether much of the below constitutes improvement.

However, I do consider that, as God has given me some measure of natural talent and/or artistic ability, the only way I will ever really improve is through practice – and so I continue to do just that. Thank God for lockdown giving us the time and space to do it!

12 thoughts on “Recent artwork

  1. I love that you are doing this! The Winter Walk and the seascapes speak the most deeply to me, but it’s probably because I don’t like very many people! 😉

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  2. So glad to see how creatively you are dealing with the pandemic! Yes, practice is the only way, but you are getting better all the time, and it shows. You have always had a special talent for portraiture, glad to see you developing that. Keep it up!!

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    1. Thanks Mum – I am encouraged when people respond positively to my portrait sketches/watercolours, but I know so many other artists who are truly gifted in likenesses, so I am aware I still have far to go – but practice is indeed the only way forward! I am looking forward to practising Sumi-e and brushwork again once I get to the Japanese section of my novel 🙂

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  3. Great to see your work so beautifully presented here Jane. There is so much feeling in it! I look forward to seeing you again tomorrow for our online gallery meetup, Best wishes, Mark

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    1. Hi Mark, thanks for commenting – I should send a link to John Pipal too, since he is featured.

      Btw, I am so grateful for the theme you suggested yesterday (the influence of Japonisme on Van Gogh’s work) – this was not only artistically inspirational, but relates very well to themes the historical novel I am presently writing (this is set in 17th century Amsterdam and Japan, and my main protagonist is also an artist – I was actually thinking of asking you if you’d be willing to read and comment on the chapters where he is conversing with his friend and art tutor/mentor Jan, who ends up becoming one of Rembrandt’s assistants in Hendrik Uylenburgh’s studio), specifically because my character’s vision and perception of the world will change through his time in Japan, so that, even as an artist, he will see the world through Japanese eyes, in much the same way Van Gogh did. I was also planning to resume studying and attempting Sumi-e brushstrokes/pen and ink work when he gets to Japan, so it would be nice to continue exploring incorporating elements of Japanese style/composition/perspective etc into a more contemporary drawing/painting style.

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  4. Jane! These are amazing! Keep up the good work! I hope that you’re able to keep creating things you’re passionate about.

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      1. Your work shows huge potential. The portrait of George Floyd is a powerful statement of feeling and justifies your interest in portrait and figuration.In it the feeling is very strong with empathy and tells the story as we know it . The abstract picture with swimmers and bright stain glass shapes is original and should be developed in new work I like your handling of water colour . There is copious energy and copious work. If the lockdown continues and you keep working you should make huge strides. I would keep all strands of the work open including landscape. The work is truly spiritual and is full of feeling containing both light and dark.that is human experience . I think you tend towards Expressionsm.

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      2. Hi Sean,
        Many thanks for your comments, observations, encouragement and artistic guidance, both here and in our chat last night. I actually hope (and intend) to continue as I am doing now with my art and writing post-lockdown, although that may also mean further external commitments and less time at home. I agree I tend towards expressionism, but I am also still developing a style. You are right, the abstract swimmer/stained art-like shapes is something I should do more of!

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  5. Your work shows huge potential. The portrait of George Floyd is a powerful statement of feeling and justifies your interest in portrait and figuration.In it the feeling is very strong with empathy and tells the story as we know it . The abstract picture with swimmers and bright stain glass shapes is original and should be developed in new work I like your handling of water colour . There is copious energy and copious work. If the lockdown continues and you keep working you should make huge strides. I would keep all strands of the work open including landscape. The work is truly spiritual and is full of feeling containing both light and dark.that is human experience . I think you tend towards Expressionsm.

    Like

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